Everything But the Kitchen Sink (A Preservation Case Study)

Learning Objectives

  • Students will think through how to respond to a disaster scenario.

Scenario

You are a staff member in a large organization that collects a wide variety of traditional and electronic records. Your stack space has a sophisticated HVAC system that is capable of maintaining ideal temperature and humidity in several zone for a variety of materials. Air is filtered appropriately, and lighting is controlled by motion sensors. The archive space is on the main floor of a several story building. Unfortunately directly above the archive space is a staff break area with kitchen facilities, and Friday before a three day weekend there was a staff get together in this space. Somehow things got out of hand. There are pictures on Facebook if your are curious, but despite the evidence and the good times had by all, the kitchen sink either became clogged or damaged. This caused it to dump an unknown quantity of water into the archive space. Not enough to float an ark, but close. Somehow the water shorted out the HVAC, and lead to no temperature and humidity controls over the weekend. This resulted in an ideal mold germination environment. You return on Tuesday to the aftermath of the party now apart of the archives.

Questions

  • What are your first steps as part of a recovery process? Think first that there is no disaster plan for this organization, and you must proceed into recovery without guidelines. How will you access issues caused by the sink? How will you recover?
  • If there was a disaster plan, what important features should it contain and issues should it cover? What type of supplies should have been set aside for such a disaster?

Bibliography

Mallery, Mary. 2015. Technology Disaster Response and Recovery Planning : A LITA Guide. Chicago: ALA TechSource, 2015. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost), EBSCOhost (accessed March 20, 2018)

No Such thing as a Free Lunch (An Outreach Case Study)

Learning Objectives

  • Student will consider the ethical dimensions of community outreach for archives and make appropriate decisions given a specific scenario.

Scenario

Your archive has a well established history of giving talks to various groups in your community about the importance of archives and preserving family records. Usually the archivist who gives these talks gets lunch or some sort of refreshment during the presentation. Rarely are you given any sort of honorarium. You have a request to present the usual talk at the local Sons of Confederate Veterans.

  • What do you do?
  • What are the possible ramifications for working with this group for your archives?
  • What are the possible ramifications for not working with this group?

Bibliography

  • Boles, Frank. “” JUST A BUNCH OF BIGOTS” A CASE STUDY IN THE ACQUISITION OF CONTROVERSIAL MATERIAL.” Archival Issues (1994): 53-65.

Beggars can’t be choosers (An Outreach Case Study)

Learning Objectives

  • Students will plan appropriate archival outreach programing given a particular scenario.

Scenario

You’re a new employee at a large and well-respected archive that has many types of collections from author personal paper collections, business collections and local community organizational records. This institution has a moderately successful lecture series that it host in the fall and spring, and a few research workshops throughout the year. It’s been noticed that participation has been trailing off over the last few events. Participants tend be older for lecture series or research workshops, but an English professor at a local college gives extra credit to his students for lectures that focus on your author collections. Those lectures tend to be well attended. Occasionally but not regularly, you conduct special tours and talks for local high schools.

Questions

  • What would you do to improve the events and programing that already exist?
  • How would you approach creating new programing that would bring in newer groups or reinvigorate previous participants?

Bibliography

  • Rettig, Patricia J. “An Integrative Approach to Archival Outreach: A Case study of becoming part of the constituents’ community.” Journal of Archival Organization 5, no. 3 (2008): 31-46.